About

Sarah Griffith Lund

I was that kid who the teacher called on to stay inside during recess to help students who needed extra time taking tests.  No wonder I grew up to be a minister! Ever since college I knew I wanted to dedicate my life to serving God and helping others. I majored in religious studies in college at Trinity University, graduated with a Master of Divinity degree at Princeton Theological Seminary, and also received a Master of Social Work degree at Rutger’s University.  Ministry and Social Work blend together my two passions of loving God and loving my neighbors. I was ordained into Christian ministry by the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in 2002 and began serving as a local church pastor in 2003. I’ve served large and small congregations in Brooklyn, Minneapolis, and New Smyrna Beach, Florida.  In 2011 I earned my Doctor of Ministry degree from McCormick Theological Seminary with a focus on revitalizing the local church. My thesis is entitled, “The Challenges to Building a Beloved Community on Facebook.”  I served the church as a Regional Minister, providing support and guidance to dozens of congregations in the United Church of Christ throughout central and western Florida. In November of 2014, I began serving as a Vice President for Seminary Advancement at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis.  I am excited about sharing part of the story about my family, faith, and mental illness with the world in my new book Blessed are the Crazy: Breaking the Silence About Mental Illness, Family, and Church. (2014, Chalice Press).  I continue to be amazed at the resilience and strength of family bonds, as I give thanks for my own family nearly every day.

9 thoughts on “About

  1. Sarah, Dear, I am so pleased that you will be in the Chapel at Trinity in October. When Mary Kay Cooper sent the email that you were to come, I sent a message to Dr. Judd and Dr. Garcia and they are as excited to see you as I am; It will be wonderful seeing you and very special to hear your message. One of my greatest personal losses has been the end of Sunday Chapel services.

    1. Hi Glenna! It’s wonderful to hear from you! I’m very excited about my visit to Trinity in October. So many good people to reconnect with and so many good memories to share. Let’s talk more about it.

  2. I read your post about Christmas in Rehab. I, too, am a minister and a girl I give Spiritual Direction to was in the same Costa Rica rehab center. As I began to read your brother’s answers to your questions, I immediately got my journal and started taking notes. So many pieces resonated and struck me as I teach and encourage others, with and without mental illness, giving hope and Light. Thank you for sharing….thank you for being another female voice in this interesting era of the Church. Blessings, sister!

  3. Enjoyed your book. I was looking for a similar book about a being a memoir, Christian (I graduated from Southern California Seminary), and I am epileptic with postictal mania. I am looking to write a book similar to yours and start a ministry at my church like the one that you recommended at the end of your book (maybe at Shadow Mountain Community Church (El Cajon, California)

  4. Dear Sarah and Jonathan, Your book is so interesting… provocative, thoughtful and terribly good. Where are you all now, if I might ask. I shall be in the US next month. Much love, Kathy

  5. Sarah,
    Thank you so much for bringing your story to us at First Church. I have had my own experiences dealing with mental illness in family members and friends. I participate in the regular book study group at church and read your book. I also heard Tim’s sermon series on mental health and illness. But you brought this to a level that reaches beyond all of that. You are an impressive speaker and make this issue very real for listeners.
    My prayer is that you find the strength to carry your message to many more people and inspire us to look honestly at a problem we too often don’t choose to look at because of the pain involved in dealing with mental disabilities honestly.
    I know about physical disability because of a younger sister born crippled and now totally disabled at age 63. The suffering, mentally and physically she has dealt with has been very real and to think of mental disability in the same way as her deformed body brings it to me in a new way.
    Thank you again for this amazing weekend of learning

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